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On the Gringo Trail

On 27 October 2010 from Arequipa, Peru , trackback

On Friday I took the bus from Lima to Ica together with together with Kath, Liz, Sarah & Natasha (all from the UK). From Ica we got taxis to Huacachina, a natural oasis in the middle of huge sand dunes. This place is now totally ruled by backpackers with lots of restaurant and nightlife (OK, 1 place).

Saturday morning the sand dunes needed to be conquered with a sand buggy, driven by Jesus. After driving across the dunes with speeds of up to 85km/h (as measured by my GPS), we stopped on a sand dune to make photos. When trying to depart, our buggy did not start anymore, but luckily Jesus had the skills to hotwire the buggy. The next stops were devoted to sandboarding down the dunes. As boarding down something has never been a skill of mine, I decided that laying on a board would be way more effective. It was, except that I got sand literally everywhere. Luckily the hostel had a swimming pool to cool down in. When resting at the side, I was offered a direct ride to Nazca. This turned out to be much faster than the bus, driving up to 155km/h on the Pan-American Highway (once again measured by GPS, the speedometer on the car stuck to zero).

In Nazca I went shopping for flights over the Nazca lines. Due to either fuel shortages (the story I was told) or safety reasons (the story I suspect) only 3 airlines were operating, boosting the prices. When I was certain I could not get a better deal, I booked a flight with Alas Peruanas. In the evening, I visited a show on the Nazca lines in the
Planetarium Maria Reiche, getting a cool photo of the full moon through a telescope.

Sunday morning I made the flight over the Nazca lines with a 6-seater Cessna (2 pilots + 4 passengers). Of course I totally forgot to take anti-motion sickness pills, and with a plane kept banking from left to right to show the lines, that was pretty hard on my stomach. But the lines were clearly visible from the sky, and it was very interesting to watch these man-made geoglyphs that have still not been explained exclusively by science.

In the afternoon I visited the Chauchilla Cemetery together with Jacqui (from New Zealand) who was also on the flight in the morning. Afterwards we went to the archeological museum (Didáctico Antonini).

Sunday evening an overnight bus from Cruz del Sur brought me to Arequipa, where I met Kath, Liz, Sarah & Natasha at the hostel again on Monday morning. Together with 2 guys we went into the centre and checked out the frozen Inca maiden in the Santury meseum.

Tuesday morning started at 03:00, because the bus to Cañón del Colca was picking us up at 03:30. Around 09:00 we arrived at the Cruz del Cóndor, from where we could see a number of condors fly through the canyon. At around 10:30 we started to trek down into the second-deepest canyon in the world. FYI: the deepest one is Cañón del Cotahuasi, but it would have take a 12-hour bus ride over unsealed roads to get there, and I could not be bothered for the extra 150 metres depth. After hiking down for 3 hours we reached the bottom, crossed the river and went back up for half an hour to have lunch. From there it was another 2,5 hour to get to Sangalle, an oasis at the bottom of the canyon, complete with swimming pool and bungalows.

Wednesday morning we started the climb out of the canyon at 05:50, and reached the top (1100m higher) after an exhausting 3 hours. We had breakfast in Cabanaconde and drove to Chivay to relax in the 39-degree thermal pools and have lunch there as well. After lunch we drove to 4910m altitude and back to Arequipa. Funny thing is that during this tour I have been alternating in speaking English, Dutch, German and my few words of Spanish. If my French had been any better I would have used that too.

I called this post “On the Gringo Trail” because that is what it feels like. Most backpackers travelling from Lima to Cuzco stop in these places and do these activities (perhaps except the Nazca lines flight). I actually looked into going to Cañón del Colca by myself using public transport, but it would take at least a day longer and only be marginally cheaper. So the Gringo Trail it is, at least up until Cuzco.

 

Comments

1. Khalid - 5 November 2010


guido. what about latest photos? cant see them yet.. enjoying ur trip so far ? 🙂

2. Guido - 17 November 2010


Khaled: I’m too busy travelling to upload photos, but that’s also because of my rather elaborate photo workflow (rotate, geotag, rename, sort)…
Don’t worry, there will be photos 🙂